Is The ‘Deep State’ Attempting To Become The Secret Fourth Branch Of The Government

(Tea Party 247) – One of the most basic facts we all learn in elementary school — way back before liberals destroyed the education system — is that our government is split into three branches, a separation of powers that is meant to keep any one branch from usurping complete control of the country and shredding our individual rights and liberties.

We have the legislative, the executive, and the judicial branches of government. Granted, this might be a brand new fact for you if you’re someone like Rep. Alexandria Ocaiso-Cortez who is a pure product of not only a government run public school, but also the recipient of a liberal college education. However, the vast majority of us knew this kind of thing early on.

Well, it seems now there’s actually a fourth, hidden branch of government, the administrative state.

Here’s more from DC Clothesline:

As early as 1937, in a “Report of the President’s Committee on Administrative Management,” the authors write:

WITHOUT PLAN OR INTENT, THERE HAS GROWN UP A HEADLESS “FOURTH BRANCH” OF THE GOVERNMENT, RESPONSIBLE TO NO ONE, AND IMPOSSIBLE OF COORDINATION WITH THE GENERAL POLICIES AND WORK OF THE GOVERNMENT AS DETERMINED BY THE PEOPLE THROUGH THEIR DULY ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES.

The problem of waste and lack of accountability in this fourth branch, the report notes, has “been clearly recognized for a generations and ha[s] been growing steadily worse decade by decade.”

The report isn’t wrong. By the late nineteenth century, “civil service reform” had ended the old system “spoils system” and the advent of lifelong “professional” civil servants, brought the establishment of a bureaucratic class which saw its interests and loyalties as separate from the elected civilian government. This detachment from elected policymakers meant the administrative state was not terribly concerned with either efficiency or responsiveness to the public. It became an interest group all its own, but with far more power than any ordinary interest group.

The creation of the professional civil service had been a victory over the legacy of the populist Andrew Jacksonwho had demanded a move away from the old “professional” bureaucracy established by the Federalists. Jackson denounced the professional bureaucrats, concluding such persons “acquire a habit of looking with indifference upon the public interests and of tolerating conduct from which an unpracticed man would revolt.” Instead, the Jacksonians insisted “rotation” in government offices “constitutes a leading principle in the republican creed.”

In practice, of course, this new non-political bureaucracy was anything but unbiased. Over time, the bureaucracy became self-consciously devoted to the “merit” system under which the bureaucrats imagined they gained and retained their offices by virtue of their own excellence.

Nonetheless, this problem of the bureaucracy as self-interested class would have remained quite limited were the powers of the bureaucracy more limited. Yet with the advent of the New Deal under Franklin Roosevelt, the size, scope, and power of the administrative state multiplied.

Moreover, as the New Deal progressed, the regulatory agencies came to assume all the powers that were supposed to be reserved to the branches of government that were given specific powers in the federal constitution. In his book Ex America (aka The People’s Pottage) Garet Garrett described this transformation:

THESE AGENCIES HAVE BUILT UP A LARGE BODY OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW WHICH THE PEOPLE ARE OBLIGED TO OBEY. AND NOT ONLY TO THEY MAKE THEIR OWN LAWS; THEY ENFORCE THEIR OWN LAWS, ACTING AS PROSECUTOR, JURY AND JUDGE; AN APPEAL FROM THEIR DECISIONS TO THE REGULAR COURTS IS DIFFICULT. … THUS THE CONSTITUTIONAL SEPARATION OF THE THREE GOVERNMENTAL POWERS, NAMELY, THE LEGISLATIVE, THE EXECUTIVE AND THE JUDICIAL IS ENTIRELY LOST.

Thus, thanks to the rise of this fourth branch of government, an American is subject to laws not passed by any Congress, and subject to judicial punishments not commanded by any court of law. It’s all done “administratively” but nonetheless allows the agencies to “make and execute their own laws.”

It has perhaps become impossible to discuss the realities of this headless fourth branch of government without noting the increasing awareness of a so-called deep state within the federal government. What portions of this administrative state constitutes the deep state, however, remains a matter of debate. Some contend it could include any and all independent administrative agencies. Others suggest the term ought to be applied only to the national-security agencies.

Certainly, the term “deep state” carries connotations beyond just regulatory agencies, but tends to point toward those agencies that can – by invoking national security and the need for secrecy — stifle efforts and oversight of the organizations in question.

President Trump faces tremendous challenges each and every day from the Deep State, a group of individuals who have taken it upon themselves to ignore the will of the American people and fight against the president and his agenda toth and anail. They want nothing more than to see him removed from office, to overturn the vote of middle America and silence the voices of those who spoke so clearly against the mainstream media and liberal political policies by supporting Trump in 2016.

It’s critical for the Trump administration to flush out the individuals who work in the Deep State and to remove them from their positions of power in order to neuter the movement and put down the coup that is currently expressing itself through the impeachment inquiry. If this isn’t nipped in the bud, it could spell the end of our way of life.

Source: dcclothesline.com/2019/11/25/the-deep-state-the-headless-fourth-branch-of-government/

Featured

More Proof That Gun Control Isn't the Solution

More Proof That Gun Control Isn’t the Solution

Gun Control and Gun Crime are Different We all know how it goes by now. There’s a mass shooting somewhere — as was recently the...